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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
and they are turning to technology for answers. >> i think some of the things like european colleagues are doing have a real potential in this country. >> you know civil libitarians have a problem with that and the expansion of it. you think the line is shifting? >> i do. i remind you that civil lib terians have a problem with everything they can find. >> bret: you would find a receptor. >> it is more receptors in the naysayers. americans are growon ups. >> we can improve your security. they haven't brought it to boston and they don't know what the cam ras will show i don't think yet. but we can do a lot more with advanced technologies without giving up our freedom and i don't think americans feel they have to give up freedom. >> in the change after the attack and our consciousness after the threat do you think? >> it depends on what the source of the threat seems to be. if it looks like a foreign attack it could have an impact and lookks like a domestic yes, it will have a different affect. >> they are scouring video tape looking for the bomber or bombers and the technology is there stop those bombe
technology may be the most powerful tool they have to help put a anytime face trace galt gear live in our west coast newsroom to explain how it works. >> while the debate goes on, megyn, on whether to release the surveillance pictures of potential suspects. we can tell you that authorities are saying that they are, quote, pretty clear of the man's face. pretty compelling stuff they say. and it appears to be a younger man. so let me show you how this facial recognition technology works. it's all about measuring the facial features. for example, the eye socket depth, cheekbone shape, the distance between the eyes, the nose width and the jaw line length. they take all these numbers and come up with numerical code or facial print. not the size of a fingerprint but still very very close. e tter of picture, clearly the better chance they hav matching it now, what happens is in mo cases, in fact we use an intern, let's show this video if you are just trying to identify the person is who they say they are that process is simple. take the person's driver's license. take a picture of them, facial c
are devouring it right from the machine. technology has eliminated patients. we need the story before the story is actually even done. i get the feeling that because of technology, we have been addicted to the adrenaline of novel at this where we need to get everything right away. what's that -- what that is causing is a pile up in the fog. all of the reporters with the information and all of it contradictory and they are scrambling like they are working in a kitchen at denny's. i haven't seen this much backtracking since a lost hitchhikers, it's nut. >> police are probably not able to get their hands on. when you think of it, a lot of the shrapnel is sadly lodged in the victims at the hospital. a the will of these victims have r. intubated. a lot of the doctors don't want to remove the shrapnel from the body which can be considered nevada some situations. i think the feds are probably dealing with a lot of obstacles as well. >> you know, i feel for everybody involved in investigating. this the pressure is so big for them to come up with an eanget today we didn't mention this yet. we do stories
personnel along our borders as well as utilization of proven surveillance technology along the highest traffic areas across the southwest border. reducing wait times at the ports of entry the budget requests 35rks00 port officers. to scurel maritime borders the budget invests in coast guard assets, including the seven national security cutter and fast response cutters. the bum continues the department's focus on smart enforcement of our country's immigration laws. it supports the administration's effort to focus the enforcement system on safety threats and the integrity of the immigration system through childhood arrivals and greater use of rosecutor yull discretion. we support more cost effective initiatives of secure communities. e budget invests in monitory compliance to work sight related laws. while continuing to support alternatives to the tension, detention reform and immigrant immigration efforts. comprehensive immigration reform will help us build on these efforts and strengthen boarder security by enabling d.h.s. while focusing on criminals, human smallingers and those who im
you identify -- do you look through mug shots? how do you find that person? >> the technology has improved tremendously in terms of facial recognition technology and they are using that matching images on video at the scene to any faces that might be in databases and running that to see if there's any sort of match. another way is, okay, here's an image that we've got. let's go back to others who we know that were at the scene and who were at businesses nearby and show a picture. that would be routine police work that is done. that's many, many aspects and i'm sure there are others that they are not going to talk to us about as they attempt to track down who planted these devices. >> help me here because all the time we're talking about union station or 30th street station in philly or anywhere, there's a big stein and an announcement. why don't they let the people see the person and say, i know this i goo, i know this woman? i assume it's a guy. >> that's part of the debate that's been going on all day today as you look at the mess that went on this afternoon with some of the bad
in this age of technology that they're able to get so much incoming information from so many different sources. on the other hand, as you say, you then have to make sure that you are whittling that down to the right sources of information. >> that's right. in this case on the video front and the photographic front, they've got a huge advantage. they know where the explosions were. you can actually work out from there. krou don't know where the videos and photos came from the public. but in terms of buildings, once you have a picture of anyone suspicious, you move out and you, you know, rapidly moving circles. how long would it take if someone was walking? let's look at that video camera. you try to piece this together. that's what what was done by the british officials after the bombing on 7/7 in 2005 and they were fundamentally able to track them all the way back to their homes. >> kevin, we just learned today the name of the third tragic fatality in this bombing. ling si lu, a graduate student from china studying statistics at boston university. i don't need to tell you the emotions around t
that, there were huge leaps in technology and biometrics and facial recognition system. i can imagine now the state-of-the art is that much further along. i'm sure it will be a big part in helping identify. >> when we talk about this mounds and mounds of evidence, it's really two different crime scenes essentially. we had two bomb sites. are they treating each of these independently or look for commonalities between the two? >> absolutely on the commonalities. think of it in terms of one major crime scene, death scene here, with some of the best technicians in all of law enforcement anywhere. going over the scene meticulously. typically starting in the peripheral and then working in in concentric circles. i'm sure technicians are still there at this point. >> all right. you know, i want to talk a little bit about how these guys are putting this case together because obviously as they're gathering the forensic evidence, at some point there has to be, you know, we're talking about potentially there may with suspects identified or certainly persons they're interested in speaking to. at s
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and missiles and stealth technology and ability to fight supersonic speeds. it may well be the way it has been designed to evade budget cutters in washington. more, sunday at 8:00 and c- span's "q&a". came into the white house. she was a 47-year-old lady who hated politics. thewas deeply depressed at death of her last surviving son. especially under the terrible circumstances in which she died. friends,ot have many unfortunately she had a wonderful family who kept her going. there always seem to be somebody there. i do not think he read very much. she was a very intellectual woman, highly educated. with that intellect and wonderful education, it seemed wasted in some way. >> the conversation on jayne pearce, the life of the 14th president, is now available on our web site. tune in monday for our next program on the first lady, mary todd lincoln. >> this documentary comes from zachary cohen of the adele davis academy in sandy springs, georgia. his message to the president looks at funding for education. it is a second prize-winning video in this year's c-span studentcam competition. >> this is
and sensors and missiles and stealth technology and the ability to fight supersonic speeds. it may well be the way it has been designed to evade budget cutters in washington. more sunday at 8:00 on c- span's "q &a." >> when the war began, congress came into session in july and issued the clinton resolution that articulated the consensus, or goals of the united states. and it was very simple. very clear. the purpose of this war is to restore the union. disrupt thet to social institutions of the south. everyone knew what that meant. in it meant not to disrupt slavery. texas austinsity of professor on the political and legal factors of emancipation on lectures in history saturday night at 8:00 eastern. >> second prize winners in the student cam competition. there documentary of the city." ♪ >> long before barack obama was president you work as a chicago community organizer after college. president obama's as part of why he went into politics was to make a difference for people on the south side and similar places throughout the country, but even after countless federal and dollarsomises,
and the military side. i've constantly tried to improve how we address the need for the next generation technology, public-private cooperation and ensuring that we have the price personnel to counter this 21st century cyberthreat. however, i am uncompromising in safeguarding the rights of our citizens and i will never sacrifice our civil liberties for unneeded intrusion. to this end, the amendment i am offering today would strengthen existing provisions in the bill to include the privacy officer and the officer for civil rights and civil liberties of the department of homeland security askey stakeholders in the report that would a-- as key stakeholders in the report. this report would assess how this legislation affected our civil liberties and privacy throughout our federal government, and the department of homeland security is the -- the key civil department in our federal government that develops and implements cybersecurity protocalls for the rest of the -- protocols for the rest of the federal government. it is crucial that they be part of any assessment and work with both the privacy office
technology, it's the only way to track them. if we invested what we should've in the air traffic system, we would have -- may not solve all of chuck's problems, but a much faster, flowing system. >> by the way, if you modernize it, you can cut back on some of the workforce permanently and save money there. that's the other issue. it's very labor intensive because of the issue that steve just described. >> before we go to break, the president is dining tonight with members of the senate, all women, isn't that nice? >> that's great. >> chuck todd, thank you. we'll see you at 9:00 on the "daily rundown." >> i'm surprised that didn't get ugly just then. >> right. >> that's great. >> we went to counseling. >>> up next, steve rattner has charts on signs of a spring slowdown. more "morning joe" when we come back. but i wondered what a i tcustomer thought? is great, hi nia... nice to meet you nia, i'm mike. what do you drive? i have a ford explorer, i love my car. and you're treating it well? yes i am. there are a lot of places you could take your explorer for service, why do you bring it back to t
time, you could argue that it means a decrease in personnel. because you're using technology, using cameras to replace, you know, eyeballs. but i don't think we've come to that determination. we're down -- the police department is down 6,000 police officers than where we were 11 years ago. so we've already sort of paid the price. and we're using to a certain extent technology to plug the gaps. we're increasing the number of cameras that we have. one of the things that we're doing, we had it in motion prior to the boston marathon. but we want to increase the number of mobile cameras that we have so we can put them up at events and then move them to other events. along our marathon route, we have 220 cameras. but most of them are on bridges. we want to increase at least the public sector cameras that we have along that route. >> all right. new york city police commissioner, ray kelly, thank you very much. it's always good to see you. >> thank you for the great job you keep doing for the city. >> thank you. >>> a new book on afghanistan that's not so good. president hamid karzai had to
in learning technology including new computers. as you can see from the 00 photo that i have brought to the floor, these are very impressive spaces and go a long way to paycheck -- to make it a friendly place. one of the goals of the library project is to help each transformed library become a hub for greater school community. because the weinberg foundation wants this to be a successful model, it has partnered with the baltimore education resource consortium to evaluate the impacting within the school community. evaluations are under way at the first three libraries and involve students, teachers, and community members. in addition to supplying books as part of each rein say, the foundation and its partners wanted to do even more to equip these new spaces with the adventure of reading. the library project in the first year launched a huge book drive with more than 40 partners and 100 pickup locations. it is clear that my fellow marylanders were eager to contribute directly to this project donating some 13,000 books valued at over $75,000. i share the story with my colleagues and the
at the massachusetts institute of technology in cambridge lit up as the american flag. >> boston is a tough and resilient town. the american people will be with them every single step of the way. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." i'm charlie rose in new york. norah o'donnell is in boston. norah, good morning. >> good morning, charlie. it's a tough morning here in boston. here is the front page of "the boston globe" it says marathon terror with a gruesome picture on the cover. i can tell you just walking here this morning, they have not cleaned up the runners route yet because it'sstill an active crime scene. we'll have incredible stories of heroism to show you this morning as well. i want to bring you the latest on the investigation. we do have new information this morning. the fbi has taken over the investigation. there's also one person of interest who is under guard at a local hospital. last night police searched his apartment in a nearby city. they seized several items. we should note that the two bombs went off with no warning yesterday near t
technology works. you go into places like grand central station you see some of the devices. they have markings from the epa on it. we also had some project bio shield and some other legislation that create ad group within the department of health and services to contract for things like vaccines and antidotes for some of these agents. we haven't funded early stage science looking at next generation of science to help protect us against future threats. jenna: being you worked in the government and the private sector what do you think is the government's role in that? some of us think, the government must have vials of antidotes stashed somewhere when something happens to help us. where is the government's role in this? where is the private sector and how do we best prepare if that is something we should be watching for? >> we'll have to provide substantial incentives for people to do the investment there is no natural market. the government is only purchaser. they trade the antidotes to hope to get stockpiled by the government and that is not a good environment. when companies lose out
technology infusedd across the curriculum in a new ways, and we're excited thatexci goring to be able to offer our r children something more rigorous. >>> you are also, i know, working toward encouraging moree family involvement, more family engagement with students in the school system and indeed thatdet seems to be a hallmark of of successful school systems, sy parent that are involved at the school, how do you try to to improve that?that how do you encourage more oforef that? th h i think it's actually both engaged families and motivatedtd students swrevmen.. we have to make schools a place where student want to go by offering, foreign languages andd extra curricular, so you willul see more robust investments inve there. we have partnered with a a foundation here in town to teach teachers and principals how to actually make parents better att helping their kids in the classroom. we're seeing some tremendous tr results and so we will spill spl that work across the district in the coming year.coming >> that's something that everybody hopes you're successful. we are with you on this.u
they needed to replace older security equipment and technology, expand restricted we keyway system ems and place security levers on all doors which allowed teachers to lock tours doors from the inside. you may say that's not expensive. why do you need to spend money? it sure adds up when you really want to secure a door and you want to do it right. so if you have many, many doors so we can help them do these things. and if they wanted to, make sure they harden their facility, that's what the money is for. now, there's a township in new jersey, they used funds to secure perimeter and playground areas by installing security gates at elementary and intermediate schools to create a safer learning environment. the new exterior fences define school boundaries making the schools safer for students. entourier gates were replaced, providing the ability to lock off specific areas of the schools during emergencies. again, it's common sense but when these schools were built, madam president, no one thought about this. everything was open. like the capitol, when i came here, i'm dating myself, a lo
shows in terms of sales volume, and we all know how we're using our technology more and more every day for our personal lives and how we defend on it. for example, the national shooting sports foundation surveyed owners of modern sporting rifles in 2010 and found that 10% of them, 10% of all rifles sold had purchased their firearms at gun shows, whereas 25% had purchased them online. 25%. believe me, i understand the political stakes for my colleagues and i sympathize. i have been there. i understand it. and comes from states like west virginia, and no state has a higher regard for the second amendment rights to bear arms than my state. in fact, on the great seal of the state of west virginia, the preamble is montani sember liberai. in latin, that means mountaineers are always free. you know how we feel. one of the review states that became a state during the civil war, broke away from virginia at that time. but west virginians are also guided by a little common sense. i have said this. in west virginia, we know what nonsense is, we know what common sense is, and now we know what gun s
to do, but ideally that money would go more towards technology and manpower. >> you would like flexibility? >> we would like flexibility. >> and the boston public health commission says the number of people injured in last week's blast is up to 264, those people have been treated in 26 area hospitals. we're back after the break. stay with us. ♪ very, very excited about that and very proud of that. >>beltway politics from inside the loop. >>we tackle the big issues here in our nation's capital, around the country and around the globe. >>dc columnist and four time emmy winner bill press opens current's morning news block. >>we'll do our best to carry the flag from 6 to 9 every morning. this show is about analyzing criticizing, and holding policy to the fire. are you encouraged by what you heard the president say the other night? is this personal or is it political? a lot of my work happens by doing the things that i am given to doing anyway. staying in tough with everything that is going on politically and putting my own nuance on it. not only does senator rubio just care
of research that is necessary to develop new means and possibly new technology, new tools that are institutions of higher learning but institutions of learning across the board, beginning with our elementary schools need to do better. and i am proud to be a cosponsor of this legislation. i look forward to working with my colleagues to assuring that it will be passed. and senator kaine, who spoke so evocatively and eloquently on this floor today and who showed such grace under pressure, which is one of the definitions of courage, in responding to the virginia tech tragedy, he has worked to deal with the wounds, and he has resolved to learn from virginia tech. and indeed he worked as a governor to seek safer campuses across virginia and across the country. he fought to put in place commonsense laws that were -- would prevent shooters like cho seung-hui from having access to the arsenal that he used six years ago. and i want to thank senator kaine for helping to lead the effort for a ban on high-capacity ammunition magazines like the ones used at virginia tech and used at new
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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